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The Institute of Internal Auditors North AmericaBreadcrumb SeparatorInternal Audit FoundationBreadcrumb SeparatorLarry Sawyer Educators’ Symposium

Sawyer's Educators' Symposium

Larry Sawyer Educators’ Symposium

Register NowDate: Sunday, July 7, 2019
Time: 8:30 a.m.–4:45 p.m.
Location: Anaheim Convention Center, Room TBD
Price: $375
CPE: 8

The educators’ symposium is designed to fulfill three distinct objectives:

  • Establish a forum for researchers to present end-stage or completed research and share aspects of classroom and practitioner applicability.
  • Provide educators with new and innovative techniques for teaching internal auditing.
  • Create an opportunity for researchers to present research concepts and proposals and receive feedback to refine the scope further to enhance value for practical application.

Program Schedule

We are pleased to announce our complete program schedule.

8:30–8:40 a.m. ​Welcome and Introductions
​8:40–9:35 a.m. The Coordination of Monitoring between the Audit Committee and the Internal Audit Function (Research)
​9:35–10:30 a.m. Adherence to the Internal Audit Core Principles and Threats to Internal Audit Function Effectiveness (Research)
10:30–10:50 a.m. Coffee Break and Networking
​10:50 a.m.–12:00 p.m. ​Using Sawyer’s in the Classroom
​12:00–1:00 p.m. ​Lunch
​1:00–2:15 p.m. Evolution of the Classroom: Technology is here to Stay.
​2:15–2:30 p.m. ​Afternoon Break and Networking
​2:30–3:25 p.m. The Internal Audit Function's Role in Risk Management: Does the Stakeholders' Salience Matter? (Research)
3:25–3:55 p.m. The Integrated Information Technology Auditor - No Longer Optional? (Research Proposal)
3:55–4:35 p.m. Peer Discussion: Topics on the Horizon
​4:35–4:45 p.m. ​Closing Remarks

Session and Speaker Information

Jacob Jaggi, MBA, CIA
University of Arizona

The Coordination of Monitoring between the Audit Committee and the Internal Audit Function

Internal audit functions and audit committees have complementary strengths. On one hand, internal auditors can benefit from guidance and authority that only the audit committee can provide. On the other hand, audit committees can benefit from objective, detailed information about the company's controls and accounting processes that only the internal audit function can provide. In fact, KPMG calls the internal audit function the audit committee’s “single most important resource” (KPMG Audit Committee Handbook, 2017). This session is about how internal audit functions and audit committees coordinate in practice and how this coordination affects the quality of a company’s internal controls and financial reporting.

In this session, participants will:

  • Discuss trends in coordination between the internal audit function and audit committee.
  • Examine how coordination between the internal audit function and audit committee affects the quality of a company’s internal controls and financial reporting.
  • Share experiences and best practices relating to audit committee interactions.

Jacob Jaggi has been a member of The IIA since 2006 and has 10 years of experience as internal auditor, controller, and SEC reporting analyst. In 2015, he made the jump to academia and has devoted his attention to studying the role of different corporate governance mechanisms (including internal and external audit functions, audit committees, etc.) in promoting financial reporting quality. He is the recipient of the 2017 Michael J. Barrett Doctoral Dissertation Grant administered by The IIA for promising internal audit research. He has (co)authored four academic working papers, been invited to present his research at numerous conferences, and looks forward to finishing his doctorate degree this year at the University of Arizona and continuing his work as research faculty.

Christopher G. Calvin, PhD, CPA, CIA
Assistant Professor, Accounting
University of Dayton

Adherence to the Internal Audit Core Principles and Threats to Internal Audit Function Effectiveness

Internal audit practitioners face a unique working environment in which they are required to be independent and objective, yet constructively critical, of processes within the organizations that employ them. Their objectivity, and thus effectiveness, could be threatened should they issue criticisms with which executive management or the board of directors disagree. The IIA’s Core Principles are a set of 10 characteristics applicable to internal auditors and internal audit functions that articulate the requirements for maximum internal audit effectiveness. This session will explore the results of research on how adherence to the Core Principles affects internal audit effectiveness.

In this session, participants will:

  • Understand the effects of adhering to the Core Principles has on the likelihood of being pressured to modify valid audit findings.
  • Investigate whether adherence to the Core Principles is associated with the likelihood to admit that pressure to modify valid findings has occurred.

Christopher G. Calvin is an assistant professor of accounting at the University of Dayton, where he teaches undergraduate honors introductory financial accounting and graduate accounting theory and research courses. His research interests include internal auditing, internal controls, auditing standards and regulation, financial reporting, and disclosure. Christopher holds a PhD in business with a concentration in accounting from Duke University and a bachelor and master’s degree in accounting from Louisiana State University. He has also completed the LSU Center for Internal Auditing Excellence program. Prior to joining academia, Christopher performed internal audit co-sourcing and outsourcing services with Deloitte & Touche, LLP. Christopher is a member of The IIA–Cincinnati Chapter.

Mark Salamasick, CIA, CISA, CRMA, CSP
Executive Director of Audit
University of Texas System

Paul J. Sobel, CIA, QIAL, CRMA
Vice President/Chief Risk Officer
Georgia Pacific, LLC

Dan Clayton CIA, CPA, CKM
Audit and Management Consultant, Internal Strategic Consulting

Using Sawyer’s in the Classroom

Sawyer’s Internal Auditing: Enhancing and Protecting Organizational Value, 7th Edition, provides businesslike structure to how internal audit leaders go about setting up and delivering services of an internal audit function. This latest edition collects ideas for further progressing the profession from 10 contributing authors living in seven different countries across the globe. These modern, diverse perspectives not only frame internal audit leading practices, they also explore the larger questions of the value delivered through these efforts and through other functions that manage risk for the organization. It is designed to be read by auditors and stakeholders interested in the mission of enhancing and protecting organizational value. In addition, it also provides new opportunities for research and as a tool in the higher education classroom.

In this session, participants will:

  • Gain insight into the structure and content of Sawyer’s, 7th Edition.
  • Derive and understand methods to link content to the higher education classroom.
  • Develop knowledge and methods to link content to research opportunities.

Mark Salamasick is executive director of audit for The University of Texas System. He recently completed 12 years as the director of the Center for Internal Auditing Excellence at The University of Texas at Dallas (UTD), where he built the internal audit program and taught a variety of internal audit courses. He is author and co-author of numerous IIA publications, including all four editions of the IIA textbook on internal auditing. Mark previously spent 20 years with Bank of America, where he served as senior vice president and director of information technology audit. Mark completed six years as a member of the Internal Audit Foundation Board of Trustees and served on the Foundation’s Committee of Research and Education Advisors for 12 years. He currently serves on the Academic Relations Committee of IIA International, chairing the North America subcommittee.

Paul Sobel is vice president/chief risk officer for Georgia-Pacific, LLC, a privately owned forest and consumer products company based in Atlanta, GA. He also serves as the chairman of the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). He has authored or co-authored four books: Managing Risk in Uncertain Times, Auditor’s Risk Management Guide: Integrating Auditing and ERM, Internal Auditing: Assurance and Consulting Services, and Enterprise Risk Management: Achieving and Sustaining Success. Paul was The IIA’s Chairman of the Board in 2013–2014 and has served in other IIA leadership roles. In 2012, he was recognized in Treasury & Risk magazine’s list of 100 Most Influential People in Finance. In 2017, he received The IIA’s Bradford Cadmus Memorial Award and was inducted into The IIA’s American Hall of Distinguished Audit Practitioners.

Dan Clayton is an independent consultant with a career in building small to large internal audit and consulting function capabilities. He served as a director of strategy and knowledge management for the University of Texas System Audit Office for six years. The preceding 10 years he served in a similar role for CHAN Healthcare, the nation's largest provider of healthcare internal audit support. As an avid researcher, he excels at designing and implementing new models and methods that leverage emerging ideas and trends. His interest in design sparked after achieving unusual success with PricewaterhouseCoopers and Denver Health and Hospital, including millions in revenue enhancement, cost savings, and involvement in a few large fraud cases. In 2019, Dan acted as concept design coordinator, project manager, and contributing author for the Internal Audit Foundation’s publication of Sawyer’s Internal Auditing: Enhancing and Protecting Organizational Value, 7th Edition. He has also published articles in Internal Auditor, New Perspectives, and other respected industry journals. Dan has served four years on the Foundation’s Committee of Research and Education Advisors and also serves on the Utah Valley University Internal Audit Advisory Board.

Joy Gray, PhD, CIA, CISA
Lecturer, IAEP Coordinator
Bentley University

Evolution of the Classroom: Technology is here to Stay

Students today face many distractions in the classroom, particularly those generated by digital devices. As professors, it is important that we understand the challenges of these devices in the classroom and look for ways to integrate and manage the technology that our students (and those who will eventually employ our students) perceive to be a normal part of their interactions with others.

Bring your cell phones and laptops for this interactive session, where participants will:

  • Understand the risks of allowing digital devices in the classroom.
  • Explore activities and share your ideas to effectively incorporate these devices, including:
    • Polling
    • Gamification
    • Online quizzes & quests
    • Active learning assignments
    • Escaping the podium
  • Use online resources outside classroom time to enhance student learning and encourage self-motivated learning, particularly in the area of new technologies.

Joy Gray, lecturer in the Department of Accountancy, is the Internal Audit Education Partnership (IAEP) coordinator at Bentley University. Her teaching experience includes courses in internal auditing, IT audit, financial auditing, forensic accounting, and introductory financial/managerial accounting. She is also active in research regarding topics related to the IT audit activities of internal auditors, IT audit history, and data analytics. Prior to her academic roles, Joy’s internal audit experience included both supervisory and staff positions at OSRAM Sylvania, Lockheed Martin, and General Electric. Her responsibilities included establishing a new internal audit department, serving as the project leader for SAP-related audit activities, and conducting both domestic and international internal audits. She also worked as a contract Sarbanes-Oxley consultant through Robert Half. She is currently a member of the Boston school committee’s taskforce to establish and oversee an internal audit function for the Boston Public Schools.

Romina Rakipi, B.S., M.S., M.S.F.
PhD Candidate
University of Pisa

The Internal Audit Function's Role in Risk Management: Does the Stakeholders’ Salience Matter?

The importance of risk management and the role of the internal audit function in risk management has grown in recent years. The current research, through the use of a fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA), examines how different salience levels of several internal audit function stakeholders can influence the risk management role within the internal audit function.

In this session, participants will:

  • Explore stakeholder identification and prioritization by chief audit executives (CAEs) using the concepts of power, legitimacy, urgency, and interest.
  • Discover how CAEs’ perceptions of stakeholders’ salience impact the role of the internal audit function regarding the risk management system.
  • Learn how CAEs’ perceptions of the salience of the different stakeholders influences the risk management activities carried out by the internal audit function.

Romina Rakipi is a PhD candidate in accounting at the University of Pisa in Italy, working on research topics related to internal auditing and risk management. Before the doctoral program, she was a credit risk manager, an accounting specialist, and a financial analyst for a German Bank based in Frankfurt. She has a bachelor’s degree in economics and finance, a master’s degree in economics, finance and insurance, and a second-level master’s degree in CFO, finance, administration, and control from the University of Pisa. Currently she is visiting the University of Kentucky Gatton College of Business and Economics as a research assistant, collaborating with Professor Urton Anderson on research projects related to internal auditing. She is a member of The IIA–Central Kentucky Chapter.

Joy Gray, PhD, CIA, CISA
Lecturer, IAEP Coordinator
Bentley University

The Integrated Information Technology (IT) Auditor – No Longer Optional?

The need to understand how to approach and resource internal audit in the area of IT audit has never been greater. One method, integrated IT auditing, appears to be expanding after a significant time of apparent plateau. In this session I will present a research proposal seeking to address questions such as:

  • Is it now necessary for every internal auditor to be an integrated IT auditor?
  • Do chief audit executive (CAE) characteristics continue to have a higher degree of correlation with the use of integrated IT audit strategy than do organizational characteristics?
  • How do practices differ between geographic regions and industries?

Joy Gray, lecturer in the Department of Accountancy, is the internal audit education partnership (IAEP) coordinator at Bentley University. Her teaching experience includes courses in internal auditing, IT audit, financial auditing, forensic accounting, and introductory financial/managerial accounting. She is also active in research regarding topics related to the IT audit activities of internal auditors, IT audit history, and data analytics. Prior to her academic roles, Joy’s internal audit experience included both supervisory and staff positions at OSRAM Sylvania, Lockheed Martin, and General Electric. Her responsibilities included establishing a new internal audit department, serving as the project leader for SAP-related audit activities, and conducting both domestic and international internal audits. She also worked as a contract Sarbanes-Oxley consultant through Robert Half. She is currently a member of the Boston school committee’s taskforce to establish and oversee an internal audit function for the Boston Public Schools.

Larry SawyerLarry B. Sawyer, CIA, CPA, (1911–2002) was an attorney, author, and ardent advocate for the internal audit profession. Known to many as “the father of modern internal auditing,” Sawyer is credited for the vision that led the internal audit profession out of activity-level auditing and defined many more ways for the profession to add value. He received numerous awards over his lifetime, becoming the first recipient of The IIA’s Lifetime Achievement Award.

Sawyer authored and published the first edition of Sawyer’s Internal Auditing in 1973. In his bequest, Sawyer indicated that the royalties from the publication of Sawyer’s Internal Auditing, 6th Edition and beyond, be donated to the Foundation. Previously, the funds supported the presentation of the Foundation’s Larry Sawyer Project of the Year Award. This year, in collaboration with the Sawyer family and in conjunction with the release of Sawyer’s Internal Auditing, 7th Edition, the Foundation is launching the Larry Sawyer Educators’ Symposium to advance research impacting the profession and further shape the education of future internal audit professionals.

For more information, please email Foundation@theiia.org.